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by melanie eversley later. you probably heard what happened in pennsylvania regarding their voter i.d. law and we will talk to her about that. we also want to take time to let you know that on our other channels on the weekend, book- tv and american history tv, we look at cities across the united states. our focus this time around is augusta, maine. not only do you get a sense of meeting the people and learning about individual cities and what makes them interesting, here is a little bit of a preview from tonight's program. [video clip] >> this is the first parish church in brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of a uncle tom's cabin. in many ways, the story began here. it is here in pew #23 that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw the vision of uncle tom being whipped to to death. he is the title character, the hero of her 1852 novel," uncle tom's cabin." the story is that there is -- there was a slave, a good slave, sold by his first kind owner, mr. shelby, and he sold him to pay debts on his plantation through a series of misadventures, you might say, he ends up in the
by the federal government, and they are challenging the law that allows this because they are concerned their communications will be picked up. up, and in the course of that surveillance, they have the right to challenge that in court. that is the standing issue. to get to the merits, fisa passed in 1978, and in the aftermath about abuses, it set up a system by which the executive branch would have to go to the court in d.c. and get permission when they wanted to do wiretapping for national security purposes. this is a way of making sure the court -- it had a check and a role in reviewing the efforts to do this wiretapping, which had designed in 1978 is congressthe problem is that in defining the parameters of what communications -- surveillance required court approval. the statute referred to the technology at the time, those communications that were wired, radioed, or satellite technology. since 1978 we have seen a dramatic change of the technology of communications, particularly fiber optic cable, which has changed the court they try to get this case in electronic surveillance. the r
in a critical battle ground state. >>> a judge blocking part of pennsylvania's controversial voter i.d. law. opponents said the law was aimed at stopping minorities and the elderly from casting ballots. >> my sense is that the republicans did this to beat obama. >> supporters argued it was hadn't to stop fraud. >> no one will be disenfranchised by the fraud. >> tonight what this decision means for the presidential election. >>> plus, trouble in the seats. seats coming loose on american airlines jets. >> my son's seat was kind of like almost falling off. we were trying to push it in and hold it in. >> i think the faa needs to look at this incident. >> now planes grounded and serious questions about safety. >>> and when this ball player stepped to the plate for the first time in the majors, a wild pitch knocked him down. >> i didn't get out away enough and it caught up under my helmet. >> now seven years later, one team is giving him another chance. tonight adam greenberg back in the big leagues. i'm bill hemmer in for shepard smith. one of the toughest voter i.d. laws in the country cannot t
begins anew on "studio b" today. the verdict is in. after challenges to a controversial voting law in the key battleground state of pennsylvania forcing everyone to show a photo i.d. before casting a ballot. we will tell you if the law will stand. >> we are a day away from the first of three presidential debates. ahead is a look at the issues that will be front and center for president obama and governor romney. >> plus, one of the biggest u.s. airlines reports more problems involving loose seats forcing emergency landing and now the airline is responding to accusations of sabotage. that is ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b" today. >> first from fox at 3:00, democrats today winning a major court decision that could have a profound affect on one of the biggest swing states in next month's presidential election. a pennsylvania judge today blocked a tough and controversial new law that would require voters to show valid photo identification. the republican-led state legislature passed the law in march. supporters claim it would prevent fraud and insure t
of the court to say what will law is and that was an expression of his understanding that the power of the judicial review is inherent in our constitutional system and that wasn't self-evident at all. so that is the power of jurisdiction, limits on jurisdiction that somebody has to have a standing at one its jurisdiction. that's another thing the court basically made up. other courts won't necessarily have that. a few years ago to give very interesting kind of judicial trip to south africa which is a fabulous constitution, modern constitution and a wonderful supreme court. the south african constitution gives people all kinds of positive rights of the right to housing and education and a right to health and its job and all this. our constitution of course doesn't. our constitution is of - rights, the government shall not in the bill of rights the government shall not. it's against the power of the government. south africa constantly rights they have no limit the supreme court has no limitation on jurisdiction. somebody can come into court and say the constitution promises me a job a
at the boston herald to tell us about the health care law that governor romney shepherded in when he was governor of massachusetts in 2006. and later on, social media and the internet and how they are affecting campaign 2012. we will be right back. ♪d >> ♪ ♪>> ♪ >> this is the first parish church in brunswick, maine. its significance to the story of an uncle tom's cabin is in many ways the story began here. in is in this new number 23 that harriet beecher stowe saw a vision of uncle tonoose being whipped to death. all cocom, as you probably know, is the title character, bureau "uncleher 1853 not vel cabin."ptainm's if anyone in the north or to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fine for breaking the law. the bill was seen as a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. so that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say i'm a christian and i'm against slavery, as was most of new england and it's my right to help a slave to find himself or herself in our borders, we have the right to do that because we're not a slave state an
for civil rights. "america's unwritten constitution" he's professor of law at the yale law school. president for the alliance of justice system. it is wonderful to have you here. this week, we have two blockbuster political events on the calendar. the first presidential debate and the return of the supreme court to washington. they will hear arguments since the first time on the affordable care act. a start and fresh reminder of the power of the court. the court returns with a docket packed with high profile cases and others likely to be heard. it's strangely almost entirely absent from the presidential campaign. it becomes alarming when you look at the age of the justices. 76, 76, 74, and the oldest is 79 years old. let's not forget she's the fifth vote to uphold a decision in roe v. wade. >> i hope to appoint justices to the supreme court that will follow the law and the constitution. it will be my impression they will reverse row v. wade. >> it's very likely the next president of the united states will appoint several justices to the supreme court. that often is the most lasting legacy of
limited. a duty for liberty and right to keep me free and uphold the rule of law to ensure the system if we suffer injury in the physical sense or through fraud. the government can't keep us safe and it's so limited they should not be telling me that i have to buy health insurance or i will get taxed more. what should the role of government be in your life we are asking you in this morning's journal. it states in the constitution of the federal government is to do. 18 enumerations, the rest are reserved for the state's and the people. next call, jeff in texas. good morning to you, sir. >> caller: that would be kevin in washington. >> host: good morning. you are on the air. go ahead. >> caller: i believe that if the proper role of the federal government is to protect individual liberties we are supposed to have rules against that, against fraud, against the injured. but the problem is the federal government has gone way beyond that. it seems like they want to redistribute what people have gained through their liberties and freedoms and once you do that, you are violating people's liber
, university of texas was doing that, they have a law called the top 10% law which basically requires the school to admit the top 10% of high school students across the state. >> from any high school. >> from any high school across the state. so, this means that diversity on campus has increased enormously and actually is higher at about 25% than it was under racial preferences, at about 21%. and so, they were, they've put racial preferences on top of that. the question is whether this is necessary or appropriate. >> paul: since the gruter decision you had sandra day o'connor replaced by samuel alito and there could be a switch in the decision? >> certainly, and a good thing they are revisiting it, paul, because there's a growing body of evidence that racial preferences, not only don't help the intended beneficiary, which is poorer blacks, usually middle class kids, and might actually be hurting the kids who receive them and i say that, a mismatch of kids in schools. in california when they ended racial references, the black graduation rate increased and that's because more kids were
all the decisions about their salaries, benefits, work worlds and they have laws and regulations that govern themselves. and if these politicians don't perform guess what? they throw them out and put their money behind somebody else. these unions will do anything in their power to elect politicians who will serve their interests. they will spend hundreds of millions of dollars, even billions of their members dues on politics. they will send an political and political ground troops which they will include paid volunteers to get out the vote. they will form alliances and donate to leftist organizations who will support a pro-union agenda or go money flows my friends from government employee unions to politicians back to the same unions in a never-ending cycle of greed and corruption. politicians know that union money will cycle back to them in return for their pro-union votes and if they cross those unions, the unions will throw them right out of office. unions reward their friends and punish their enemies very effectively. and the amount of money they can bring to bear as neighbor
should be a very, very limited. judy rights -- to keep me free to uphold the rule of law. to ensure a system of justice if i or we suffer injury in the physical sense or through fraud, the government cannot keep us safe. what should the role of government be in your life? we are asking you on this friday morning. on twitter -- clearly facing the constitution with the federal government is to do. 18 enumerations. the rest are reserved for the states and the people. next up caller, a republican from texas. good morning. caller: that would be kevin from texas. i believe the proper role of the federal government is to protect individual liberty. we are supposed to have a rules against fraud, against injury. the problem is the federal government has gone way beyond that. it wants to redistribute what people have gained through their liberties and freedom. once you do that, then you are violating the people's liberty. i think they have gone way too far. there telling us to buy light bulbs, what kind of cars to buy, what kind of insurance to have the. it is ridiculous, it really is. let th
with environmental laws and despite that loss 10,000 jobs in the last few years. joining us is robert bryce with the manhattan institute and author of power hungry. he is our guy at "varney and company". welcome to the program. point by point. what subsidies does the wind industry get? >> at the federal law will one that is at issue is production tax credit two.two cents per kilowatt hour of electricity produced. it is a lot because in some markets now that subsidy seeks the market price of the electricity being produced by other generators so in some markets in texas the wind energy business is bidding negative prices and paying to put their electricity into the grid so they can collect them in a stuart: tax subsidies for, what our greater than any other form of energy. >> reports i releasing with man had an institute shows the subsidies for the wind industry are at least 12 times what is given to the oil and gas industry on punitive energy produced. stuart: next one. the preferences that they get around environmental laws. >> this just chaps' my hide. [talking over each other] >> i have b
see. here with it is cnn's kyon law. >>> dinner time means family time at the skillman household, from who is chopping to who's stirring. to who's sitting around the table and who soon won't. how hard is this for your family? >> not real sure. i don't think it's hit them yet. i really don't. >> reporter: a grandfather to three girls, his other title is master sergeant dan skillman, u.s. army reserves. he deploys to afghanistan in weeks, with his wife, master sergeant lola skillman and their oldest son, james, a sergeant. husband, wife, and son will be gone nine months as reserve support at kandahar. despite the 29 years that lola served, this will be her first time deployed to a war zone. are you scared at all? >> yes. some people say no, they're not scared, they're ready to go do this. but i think in the back of everybody's mind it is a little bit terrifying. >> reporter: at the skillman home where the unpaved road meets a montana big sky, they know about sacrifice for country. lola's father was awarded the purple heart during world war ii. dan's father joined the national guard. dan
, that's what we did. [applause] the new health care law helps make sure you don't have to worry about going broke just because you or a loved one gets sick. insurance companies can no longer put lifetime limits on your care. or jack up your premiums without reason. or drop your coverage when you need it most. they can no longer discriminate against children with pre-existing conditions. and soon they will no longer be able to deny you coverage based on pre-existing conditions like breast cancer or charge you more for the same care just because you're a woman. this law has already allowed nearly seven million young adults under the age of 26 to sign up and stay on their parents' health care plan. it's already saved millions of seniors on medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription medicine. and millions of americans have actually gotten a rebate from their insurance company if that company -- you got one? [applause] i wanted to say -- i mean, she was a supporter. but i didn't know about -- [laughter] you get a rebate if the insurance company spent too much on demitch costs and c
are ineffectual policies like the president's healthcare law and stimulus packages, but the cost of those policies as compared to romney's own perscriptions that call for smaller less expensive government. for the president what he's going to try to do is say look, maybe things aren't so great but it is partly the fault of george w. bush and the republicans who were in office prior to the democrats taking control in 2009, so we need time to fix it, and by the way, the president will also say that he wants to increase taxes on people like mitt romney to help pay down some of that debt. >> reporter: we just put of that graphic there showing the $16 trillion of debt and there are so many digits it almost doesn't fit on the tv screen across the screen there, as you can see. but haven't americans in some way become number to astronomical numbers? how serious is this in. >> they have become number. is it the new normal this massive spilling of red ink but it raises three problems which i don't think the nation has got even to grips with yet. number one our economy is smaller than our debt. we look like
. one of the first laws passed by the first congress back then. whether the defendant may be liable under those violations. a territory of a foreign sovereign. this is very important human right case that will determine whether or not victims of human right abuses can sue corporations in the united states for violations of the billion tort statute of 1789. the question -- it is no question if an billion, like an ambassador gets assaulted by an american citizen, this statute would apply. now justices are being asked if it should be much more expensive and evolving human right cases and foreign companies where there is no particular u.s. nexus. the justice has sounded skeptical of broadening this law, the application of this loss in these kind of cases. connell: peter barnes, thank you very much. dagen: you want even more on the supreme court. we have judge andrew napolitano talking with us about protecting the information on your cell phone. connell: that is coming up a little bit later on in the hour. one of the big name banks got a big write up over the weekend. we will tell you mo
in the nation that has done this for kids and for teenagers. governor jerry brown signed this ban in into law over this past weekend and tweeted about it. let me read one of his tweets. this bill bans nonscientific, quote, therapies that have driven young people to depression and suicide. joining me is david pickup, a reparative therapist and spokesman for the national association of research and therapy of homosexuality, he is getting miked up. also with me right now is cnn's senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. so, elizabeth, as we await david, just begin with what we know about this so-called reparative therapy. >> the american psychological association had a task force that took a long look at this. and here's what they came up with. they said there is no good studies showing it works or doesn't work. so no good studies showing this works. they say some people have been harmed by it, depression, other problems. and this is a quote, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of psychological interventions to change sexual orientation. >> okay. >> plainly spoken. >> hold tha
is a harvard law grad, former assistant p.a., and peace corps volunteer. and now representing suburban boston in congress. the republican challenger, 37-year-old sean belot, is an ivy league educated marine. >> i have a decade in business. >> reporter: in a debate sunday, belot argued kennedy isn't ready and is coasting on the family coast tails. >> i don't think any other district in the country people would consider you qualified for this office. >> i've got a sizeable record of public service. >> reporter: joe, who introduced a tribute to ted kennedy at the democratic convention. >> for my uncle kennedy, politics was always about people. >> reporter: he says he knows his name comes with benefits. >> it's certainly an advantage, i'm very proud of my family's history of public service. >> reporter: spanning six decades of fabled and at times flawed history. jfk went to congress in 1947, before the camelot days of the white house. bobby and ted served in the senate. their sons, joe and patrick, in the house. and now it's joe's son who is on the ballot. and getting a boost from his grandmother
. it is against the laws of nature. it is accruing for itself power we never gave. >>neil: i will put you down as "not liking" this. >>judge napolitano: mildly. >>neil: i could make a point, a stretch of a point, to say in schools, maybe. but now you are in my home. >>judge napolitano: the government with like to get in our homes. petroleum did not go help to government unless you are ron paul to shrink it but to use the power to regulate human behavior. some believe they are regulating human behavior if the good. others just do not agree. >>neil: the good argument is we get thinner, healthy, and the health care costs go down. >>judge napolitano: that is the argument. >>judge napolitano: the same federal government that cannot deliver the meal to our homes reliably wants to come in can tell us what to eat in our homes. >>neil: how would they police it? >>judge napolitano: probably put the burden were on the states so they will bribe the states. you want money to fix your highways and schools? regulate what people do in their homes. have the police knock on your doors at dip -- dinner tame. >>n
, this man returned to new york to continue his law practice. he also acted in american express commercials. oh, wow. i was going to show you a little bit. actually, let's take a little bit of a look. but steve kornacki may know. >> do you know me? i ran for vice president of the united states in '64. so i shouldn't have troublie charging a meal, should i? with this, they treat me as though i had won. >> william miller. >> steve kornacki knows william miller. when we sit around in nerdland and think about this, oh, this is the one that nobody can get. of course, william miller. of course it is. >>> which unsuccessful vp candidate returned to serve as governor for 264 days before stepping down. >> sarah palin. >> very good. although there is a weird gender coherence thing going on. being, it was sarah palin. she remained governor of alaska for almost nine month before becoming the world's biggest facebooker updater. >> there was at least a while in this race a question whether or not she was going to be in the hat for the vp. but no. not this time. okay. next question. which losing vice pres
, no new laws to limit unions rights if the constitutional amendment is approved and prevent michigan from ever becoming a right to work state and number three it could give unions the ability to mount endless, i mean, endless challenges to local governments. democrats and former lt. governor went head to head with the unions in part he did, perhaps also went head to head as well, but he did save the new york city transit system in the '80s and joins us now on the expertise of running a big state. welcome to the program. >> good to be back. >> if you were trying it run and upper echelons of government in michigan, would you want this constitutional amendment, given the unions this kind of power? >> i'm not an expert at this, but to the extent i read about it, no, i would not. i to not believe in constitutional or in some cases statutory restraints on the ability of the political process to produce a result. we've had serious problems and fiscal problems in most states. i think-- >> you don't want to see governments, state governments go heads to head with the unions. you want more after co
of corporate representatives to rule on american laws and american regulations and tell us whether our laws and regulations are legitimate in the eyes of national corporations and they can fine u. this agreement gives us the ability to cause us taxpayers to have to pay them for the right to protect our environment and our water supply and our climate and human rights and wages and things like that. so this is absolutely outrageous. if we could go back to a system of one person, one vote, and have a real free press that enabled us to communicate and inform each other this would be a wonderful idea. unfortunately we're not there right now, so political parties in my view allow us to work together around the shared agenda. and the green party is really the one political party that is not funded by corporate money, by money that's coming from special interests. so in my way it's a way -- view it's a way for us to work together on our lives, future, education, our health and environment. host: according to the latest fcc records you received a recent installment of about $160,000, part of the ma
beaten to death. was written cabin" very much as a protest novel to the fugitive a state law or anyone in the north, including new england, with the abolitionists and -- if anyone in the northwest to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fine for breaking the law. this was seen as a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say, listen, i am a person, harriet beecher stowe, and i'm against slavery, as was much of new england, and i just my right to call a slave who finds him or herself -- t.s. my right to help the slave who finds him or herself within our borders. >> more about it. beecher stowe this weekend as -- or about. beecher stowe this weekend as we look behind the history and literary history of augusta, maine. sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called "yes, but is it art?" at was accused of being a philistines, someone without the ability to appreciate con
kyi. >>> a deadly overnight. >> why police say a fire at the mayor's private law office is an act of domestic terrorism. >>> a flood of complaints filtering in about a raid at the oakland coliseum. >>> good morning. welcome do mornings on 2. it's sunday, september 30. i'm claudine wong. >>> gets get to rosemary and a look at the sunday forecast. good morning. >> good morning you to. our major warm-up continues for your sunday afternoon. highs will be 5 to 10 to 12 degrees above yesterday's highs. at this hour sunnier skies outside our doors. less after marine layer. it's a cool start in some areas. i'll have a detail of your afternoon highs coming up. >>> in overnight news, one person is dead after a fight in san jose. just before 1:00 this morning, police were called to a disturbance in the area of monterey highway and bearle avenue. another man who may have been stabbed in the same area was transported to the hospital. officers are checking to see if the two cases are related. >>> oakland police received numerous noise complaints about a large raid. tens of thousands of people p
the law. um, and if you do that in this case, there is no reasonable justification for a continuation of the exclusivity ban. so i think, i think the chairman's order, um, as you describe it, um, is the appropriate course of action to take. um, you know, are -- and that's been comcast's position in the proceeding. um, life is long. as you note, our order lasts until 2018. um, and so for whatever it applies to over that period of time, it applies to. but after that period of time we should be treated like everybody else, um, and again if, um, if people believe that it is appropriate for the exclusivity ban to continue, they need to go back to congress and to get different legislation than the legislation that exists now. because the current legislation simply does not support the exclusivity ban in the current competitive positive -- posture of the marketplace. >> what happens when october 5th rolls around and it expires? do we suddenly see several exclusive contracts out there? >> guest: i don't think so. i think the fears have been overstated. i think that the marketplace now is such
for their trust, earn their support and eventually their vote. >> reporter: he is a harvard law grad, peace corps volunteer. now representing suburban boston. >> i have a decade in business, helping grow companies. >> reporter: in a debate televised sunday, he argued kennedy isn't ready and is coasting on the family coat tail. >> i don't think in any other state or district in the country people would consider you're qualified for this office. >> i have a sizable record of public service. >> reporter: joe who introduced a tribute to ted kennedy at the democratic convention. >> for my uncle teddy, politics was always about people. >> reporter: he knows his famous name comes with benefits. >> it is an advantage, i am proud of my family's history of public service. >> reporter: spanning six decades of sometimes a flawed history. jfk went to congress in '47 before the camelot days of the white house. bobby and ted served in the senate. their sons, joe and patrick, in the house. now joe's son who is on the ballot, getting a boost from his grandmother ethel. >> she has been on a number of campaign stop
the teacher union year after year. i should maybe come out and say my sister-in-law is a union school teacher in milwaukee so i would be in big trouble if i had written anything different about this movie. but for is some reason and i think the reason is the billionaire christian right wing guy who financed this film, this movie is somewhat cleverly packaged, not all that cleverly packaged, kind of trojan horse which wants to be a stand and deliver you know inspirational message for all americans and is trying to convince you it's the teachers union is responsible for everything wrong with american education. >> andrew, the movie focuses on the so-called parent trigger laws which allows parents to sign a petition to essentially take over the school and make dramatic changes if it's failing. that sounds like empowering parents. that doesn't sound like a bad thing. i would say that the notion of allowing parents to take control of a school and have more control over the child's education, doesn't also seem like a fundamentally conservative idea to me. >> it isn't necessarily i suppose a fundame
can practice our laws as we see fit. >> more about harriet beecher stowe's this weekend as booktv, american history tv and c-span local content vehicles with behind-the-scenes at the history of literary life of augusta, maine and noon eastern on booktv on c-span2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> michael grunwald presents his thoughts on the $800 billion stimulus bill, the american recovery reinvestment act signed into law by president obama on february 17, 2009. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thanks, all of you, for coming and braving the rain. i am thrilled to start by 4 in new york. my wonderful parents are here. the only new yorkers who go to florida to visit their grandchildren. there are a lot of facts and figures and fun characters and colorful stories. i knew it was going to be controversial and it would be revisionist history of the obama stimulus and everybody hates the obama stimulus. obama he did too. a year after it passed a percentage of americans who believe the stimulus created jobs was lower than the percentage of americans w
investigation. the filmmaker refuse to share outtakes citing shield laws. >> we believe we are protected under the shield laws as journalists and we don't think it's fair for the government to intrude in our research. >> reporter: a lawyer for the city says the film isn't journalism because it advocates for the five. in a statement, the city says, quote, if the plaintiffs truly want an open airing of the facts, they should encourage the filmmakers not to hide anything. the filmmakers claim the documentary sticks to the facts. what do you make of the city trying to go after the outtakes for this film? >> the city needs to stop dragging their feet. i don't think they would find anything other than what they already know, that we were innocent and this is just going to continue to further restate that. >> reporter: yusef says no matter the outcome, he may never fully escape his nightmare that started in in park. susan candiotti, cnn, new york. >>> the world watches cape canaveral, florida. live pictures. look at that. i love looking at space pictures. it's not quite up there yet. this launch is a
law stirring up the controversial law. >> the bars in d.c. are staying open until 4 a.m. not everyone thinks that is a good idea. next. when i was younger and... financially stable. we were poor. the mgm casino in michigan. and it changed her life. clerk. way up. insurance... and i make great money. seven will create... twelve thousand jobs. to accountants... and construction workers. place to work with good pay... and great benefits, vote for question seven. catch the great taste of pumpkin before it's gone. hurry into dunkin' donuts and grab a pumpkin muffin or donut today. america runs on dunkin'. we're here! [ giggling ] these days, nobody has time to get sick. mom, i don't feel good. but minuteclinic makes it easy to get well. our nurse practitioners can diagnose and write prescriptions for everything from strep throat to sinus infections with no appointment necessary, so you can feel better in no time. minuteclinic, the medical clinic in cvs pharmacy, now offering flu shots every day, no appointment necessary. find a clinic near you at minuteclinic.com. . >>> a courage alert wit
on record. >> series of coordinating nationwide law enforcement action, charges have been brought against 91 defendants including doctors, injuriesnurs other licensed medical professionals for their alleged participation in fraud schemes involving $430 million in false billings. >> the justice department says the themes were based in 7 cities including new york, chicago, los angeles and miami. holder says one doctor in dallas allegedly was behind over $100 million worth of false bills. 91 people were charged in medicaid fraud case last year. >> they say it has nothing to do with politics. >> analysts have on several occasions recognized the men who appears freed. >> it is osama bin laden. >> we are talking about a really controversial movie about osama bin laden and the raid. this will air on television two-days before the presidential election. the national geographic channel will air seal team 6. it is being distributed the weinstein company co-chair man harvey weinstein. he's a big supporter of president obama. the channel says the air date was picked to help promote the start of the fall
and one of their candidates. maybe not one of federal law, but there should be one that you inform the people about who is running for political office. host: gary johnson. guest: as a statement, i could not agree more. host: your thoughts about trade, specifically protectionism. how much? guest: i am not the tariff guy. for the most part, all of us criticizing crony capitalism. the free market's really do work. the trade really does work. who benefits if china is subsidizing their goods and services? we are in the united states, believing that any family can spend less money on goods and services, we benefit from that. who takes it on the chin? who suffers? it is the citizens of china, and if we let these things play out, things correct themselves. this is not to say that the markets do not have bubbles, just like manipulated markets, but i think the market has a much more efficient way of dealing with bubbles that it created. so no tariffs. host: how does gary johnson feel about obamacare? you spoke about this a bit. your reaction to the supreme court. tell us more. guest: a good
: this just in. judge blocks voter id law in pennsylvania. >> that's good. it will give us at least some time to try to get people indication. that's the problem we're less than six weeks out now. >> stephanie: exactly. are we very excited about our debate coverage tomorrow. >> i cannot wait. >> stephanie: i know. and then i'm going to stay there and drink, and watch the debate and taunt you. >> that's what i heard. >> you are just going to destroy the sets -- >> she is going to be a little clingy. >> stephanie: i don't get to see her in person very often, so i'm like a kowala. she'll have to pry me off of her. >> i don't know if you tune in to "the young turks" in the afternoon, but she does a lot of twitter stuff. >> stephanie: and you guys are like the a-team. we're not even prime time. we'll be like little match girls -- and then the a-team will do post debate coverage. >> yes. it is past my bedtime but i'll be forced to attend. >> stephanie: everybody is doing it from new york. >> the big guys. stepchildren are here in l.a. >> stephanie: yeah, we're going to be drinki
at 8:55 p.m. >> the man accused of murdering trayvon martin cartin cars laws. what producers did that made him sound like a racist in his infamous 911 call. >> heather: a simple t-shirt supporting governor romney sets off a series of events. a student kicked out of class just for wearing this shirt. they say the fallout just won't stop. and those well grounded. for what's around this corner... and the next. there's cash flow options from pnc. solutions to help businesses like yours accelerate receivables, manage payments, and help ensure access to credit. because we know how important cash flow is to reaching your goals. pnc bank. for the achiever in you. [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. and always have. so does aarp, an organization serving the needs of americans 50 and over for generations. so it's no surprise millions have chosen an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealth
john roberts the deciding vote that upheld president obama's health care law and sparked debate across the country. and keys to the city sold, locks smith sold a ring to an undercover reporter. a dream come true to potential terrorists, elevators, open subway gates, and access to 1 world trade center, he reportedly stole them for a measley 150 bucks and reported will i still has more keys he's trying to sell. well, miss one school lunch payment and you get the hard boiled egg special. that's the new rule at a new jersey school district. a student at two schools owes 3.10. they only get a hard bold egg, crackers and carton of milk for lunch, instead of a full meal. that was not announced until the first day of classes, they've not yet commented. >> alisyn: i think that's great, a great punishment. >> dave: yeah, you'd probably take that punishment. >> alisyn: i could happily-- >> and nothing worse, i mean, hard boiled eggs. and i don't like within 12 feet. >> alisyn: breakfast, hard boiled egg, sounds good. >> horrible. you have the mayonnaise. >> i snuck it to my wife in this chicken s
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